Vulnerable pupils

Published: Thursday, 15 March 2018

Here you will find all the articles, Toolkit items and Q&As relating to Vulnerable pupils.

Scroll down to see the articles, supporting Toolkit documents and Q&As in this section. You will find the most recent ones listed at the top.

Articles

  • Supporting transgender students

    Supporting transgender students  

    Many schools now have students who identify with the opposite sex that they were assigned at birth. Sam Garner gives a brief overview of what schools can do to support students.

  • Safeguarding SEN pupils

    Safeguarding SEN pupils  

    Children and young people with SEN may need extra help and provision to help them understand the rules around safeguarding in school. In this article, Suzanne O’Connell describes the policies and plans that settings should have in place.

  • Eating disorders

    Eating disorders  

    Dr Suzanne O'Connell looks at the worrying problem of eating disorders in schools.

  • Self-harm amongst primary age children

    Self-harm amongst primary age children  

    Dr Suzanne O'Connell looks at the growing problem of self-harm amongst primary age children.

  • Supporting the children of offenders

    Supporting the children of offenders  

    Children who have a parent in prison are a hidden group. The experience can have a profound effect with many implications that schools may not be aware of. In this article, Neera Sharma, policy adviser at Barnardo’s, provides some ideas that schools can implement.

  • ASD, anxiety and attendance

    ASD, anxiety and attendance  

    Having autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) can make school a challenging place to be. In some cases this impacts on attendance, with pupils preferring not to come to school at all. Natalie Packer explains what the condition is and the support schools can provide.

  • Supporting a visually-impaired pupil in the classroom

    Supporting a visually-impaired pupil in the classroom  

    Rosie Eachus gives an overview of what visual impairment really means and suggests practical ways to support young people in their learning environment.

  • ADD and ADHD: A case study

    ADD and ADHD: A case study  

    Tania Tirraoro writes about her experiences of ADD and ADHD. As she packs with her sons, who are both now at university, she looks back at what she’s learned.

  • Keeping the child at the centre

    Keeping the child at the centre  

    In an article based on his session at the Autumn Attendance Matters conferences, Ben Whitney considers whether some current trends in attendance enforcement do not pay enough attention to student welfare.

  • Tackling bullying in schools

    Tackling bullying in schools  

    Bullying is defined as: ‘Behaviour by an individual or group, usually repeated over time, that intentionally hurts another individual or group either physically or emotionally’.

  • The impact of adoption

    The impact of adoption  

    Almost all schools will have children who have been adopted. Around three quarters of those adopted are because of abuse or neglect. Many experience multiple losses including loss of their birth family, of a foster family, friends and previous schools.

  • Dealing with the implications of fast track adoption

    Dealing with the implications of fast track adoption  

    The government promoted it as cutting back on bureaucracy but is fast tracking children through the adoption process such a good idea? John Viner looks at what it means for the child and the school.

  • Supporting through long-term medical conditions

    Supporting through long-term medical conditions  

    For parents of children with long-term medical conditions, school attendance can be a major issue. Here, Lesley Black from the charity Contact a Family, shares some tips and advice about how schools can support these families before, during and after long periods off school.

  • Supporting mental health on a limited budget

    Supporting mental health on a limited budget  

    We know that there are concerns about pupils’ mental health and schools are keen to help. What can you do when there’s not much money left to use? Rosie Eachus provides some practical ideas for schools.

  • When the bullies keep you from school

    When the bullies keep you from school  

    Being persistently absent is one solution for children who are being bullied at school. Stephen Burnage considers the links and how a school might work holistically to tackle bullying and improve attendance.

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