Landmark ruling on the Isle of Wight case: An opinion Free article: Children, school and part-time work Free article: Employability skills and Ofsted Free article: A-Z of codes - Applying the codes in practice Free article: The common inspection framework Personal development, behaviour and welfare A-Z of Codes 5: Codes M, N, O, P and R Free article: Infection control in schools Free article: Prosecution or penalty notice: Which is the correct response? Free article: Managing difficult conversations Free article: Parental engagement: working with hard-to-reach families Free article: A-Z of codes 1: marks for 'present' Free article: The use of penalty notices: the pros and cons Free article: Incentivising attendance - what really works Free article: Practical tips for transforming lateness into punctuality Free article: Best practice case study: Waldegrave School

Landmark ruling on the Isle of Wight case: An opinion

Ben Whitney gives his take on the recent Supreme Court ruling.

Free article: Children, school and part-time work

Ben Whitney enters the debate on the role of children in the workplace and discusses what help and regulation should exist to support them.

Free article: Employability skills and Ofsted

Under the new inspection framework, schools will be inspected on pupils' economic well-being – and that includes attendance rates. 

Free article: A-Z of codes - Applying the codes in practice

To conclude this series of reference guides, Ben Whitney reflects on some of the issues it has raised, both in correspondence and through questions by participants at Forum attendance conferences.

Free article: The common inspection framework Personal development, behaviour and welfare

A new common inspection framework is now in effect, and pupil attendance can be reviewed in terms of personal development, behaviour and welfare.

A-Z of Codes 5: Codes M, N, O, P and R

Continuing his series of handy reference guides, Ben Whitney explores each of the recommended Codes in detail, including:

Free article: Infection control in schools

Infections that cause diarrhoea, vomiting, common colds and flu are responsible for the loss of thousands of school days each year. Martin Hodgson gives guidance on what you need to…

Free article: Prosecution or penalty notice: Which is the correct response?

Ben Whitney looks at the circumstances that might dictate how schools and local authorities respond to cases of persistent absence.

Free article: Managing difficult conversations

Some conversations -whether with pupils, their parents or colleagues - are always going to be uncomfortable. In this article, Louise Wingrove looks at managing difficult subjects with care and confidence.

Free article: Parental engagement: working with hard-to-reach families

In this article, Professor Ken Reid explores some of the many options for families to play a larger part in school life, with potential benefits for both the children and…

Free article: A-Z of codes 1: marks for 'present'

In this series of handy reference guides, Ben Whitney explores each of the recommended Codes in detail.

Free article: The use of penalty notices: the pros and cons

Professor Ken Reid examines the use of penalty notices (PNs) since the Children Act 2006, including some discussion on recent developments in Wales and the issue of regional variations in…

Free article: Incentivising attendance - what really works

David Birch outlines the importance of reward systems as a means of improving attendance in schools. Read on to find out about the merits of commercial schemes and the essential…

Free article: Practical tips for transforming lateness into punctuality

Steve Baker provides some practical advice on how to tackle persistent lateness and develop school-wide policies to encourage, develop and maintain punctuality.

Free article: Best practice case study: Waldegrave School

Our reporter Helen Clark finds out how one outstanding school has just achieved its best-ever attendance figures.

Free article: The common inspection framework Personal development, behaviour and welfare

Published: Friday, 04 September 2015

A new common inspection framework is now in effect, and pupil attendance can be reviewed in terms of personal development, behaviour and welfare.

Summary

  • From September 2015, the key area of 'behaviour and safety' will be replaced by a new section entitled 'personal development, behaviour and welfare'.
  • Schools will be expected to deal with sexual exploitation and religious extremism.
  • In the report there will be separate written judgements on learners' behaviour and on personal development and welfare; there will also be an overall judgement and grade for personal development, behaviour and welfare.

Inspection has changed and two key documents – The Common Inspection Framework and The Inspection Handbook – make it clear what inspectors will be looking for.

From September 2015, the key area of 'behaviour and safety' was replaced by a new section called 'personal development, behaviour and welfare'. In part this was because there is now a common inspection framework and therefore this judgement must be applied across providers from early years to post-16. However, the judgements will be applied appropriately to each remit and this will be clarified in separate inspection handbooks.

In the inspection report, there will be a written judgement on learners' behaviour and a separate written judgement on personal development and welfare. There will then be an overall judgement and grade for personal development, behaviour and welfare.

The common inspection framework

The common inspection framework came into effect from 1 September 2015 (http://bit.ly/1RtEqB2) . It brings together inspection arrangements for maintained schools, academies, non-association, independent schools, further education and skills providers, and registered early-years settings.

Grading scales

A four-point grading scale is used:
1. outstanding
2. good
3. requires improvement
4. inadequate.

Judgements

Inspectors will make a judgement about overall effectiveness. They will also make grade judgements about:

  • effectiveness of leadership and management
  • quality of teaching, learning and assessment
  • personal development, behaviour and welfare
  • outcomes for children and learners.

Effectiveness of leadership and management

When making this judgement, leaders, managers and governors must:

  • demonstrate an ambitious vision and have high expectations
  • improve staff practice through rigorous performance management
  • evaluate the quality of provision through robust self-assessment
  • provide learning programmes with suitable breadth, depth and relevance
  • successfully plan and manage learning programmes
  • actively promote equality and diversity, tackle bullying and discrimination, and narrow gaps in achievement
  • actively promote British values
  • make sure that safeguarding arrangements protect children, promote welfare, and prevent radicalisation and extremism.

Quality of teaching, learning and assessment

Inspectors will look for the extent to which:

  • teachers, practitioners and other staff have consistently high expectations
  • teachers, practitioners and other staff have a secure understanding of the age group and subject knowledge
  • assessment information is gathered from examining what children and learners already know
  • assessment information is used to plan appropriate teaching and learning strategies
  • except for very young children, learners understand how to improve as a result of useful feedback
  • there is engagement with parents, carers and employers
  • there is equality of opportunity and recognition of diversity
  • English, mathematics and other skills are promoted.

Personal development, behaviour and welfare

Inspectors will look for the extent to which:

  • there is pride in achievement and commitment to learning
  • there is confidence, self-awareness and understanding of how to be a successful learner
  • there is impartial careers advice and guidance
  • there are relevant employability skills
  • there is prompt and regular attendance
  • guidelines for behaviour and conduct are followed
  • there is understanding of how to keep safe, including from abuse, sexual exploitation and extremism
  • there is knowledge of how to keep themselves healthy
  • there is respect for others and an ability to contribute to wider society and life in Britain.

Outcomes for children and other learners

Inspectors will evaluate the extent to which children and learners:

  • progress well from their different starting points
  • attain relevant qualifications.

Attendance and punctuality

Inspectors will consider:

  • overall absence and persistent absence rates for all pupils, and for different groups in relation to national figures for all pupils
  • the extent to which low attenders are improving their attendance over time and whether attendance is consistently low (in the lowest 10%)
  • punctuality in arriving at school and at lessons.

School Inspection Handbook

The evaluation schedule

Inspectors will make judgements on the following areas:

  • overall effectiveness
  • effectiveness of leadership and management
  • quality of teaching, learning and assessment
  • personal development, behaviour and welfare
  • outcomes for pupils.

Inspectors will first make key judgements on:

  • quality of teaching, learning and assessment
  • personal development, behaviour and welfare outcomes for pupils.

They will then judge the effectiveness of any:

  • early-years provision
  • 16 to 19 study programmes.
  • They will then make a judgment on:
    • effectiveness of leadership and management.

Finally, inspectors will evaluate:

  • the effectiveness and impact of provision for spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) guidance
  • the extent to which the education provided by the school meets the needs of the range of pupils at the school including:
    • disabled pupils
    • pupils who have SEN.

Key points: Personal development, behaviour and welfare

The inspection report will contain a clear written judgement about behaviour, and a separate clear written judgement about personal development and welfare. The lower of the two will determine the overall judgement.

This judgement includes (taken from the grade descriptors):

  • attendance and punctuality
  • attitude of learners (confidence, pride in achievements and school)
  • showing respect
  • discussion and debate
  • careers guidance
  • valuing education
  • conduct and self-discipline
  • prevention and dealing with bullying
  • pupils are safe and feel safe
  • keeping healthy
  • staying safe online
  • SMSC provision.

They will use evidence from:

  • documentary evidence about behaviour
  • observations of pupils
  • use of exclusion
  • views of parents, staff and others
  • views of different groups of pupils
  • case studies of pupils for whom referrals have been made, disabled pupils, those with SEN, looked-after children, and those with mental health needs.

Inspectors will look for the extent to which:

  • there is pride in achievement and commitment to learning
  • there is confidence, self-awareness and understanding of how to be a successful learner
  • there is impartial careers advice and guidance
  • there are relevant employability skills
  • there is prompt and regular attendance
  • guidelines for behaviour and conduct are followed
  • there is understanding of how to keep safe, including from abuse, sexual exploitation and extremism
  • there is knowledge of how to keep themselves healthy
  • there is respect for others and an ability to contribute to wider society and life in Britain.

Further information

  • School Inspection Handbook: Handbook for inspecting schools in England under section 5 of the Education Act 2005: http://bit.ly/1RtEqB2
  • The common inspection framework: education, skills and early years: Handbook for inspections carried out, respectively, under section 5 of the Education Act 2005 (as amended), section 109 of the Education and Skills Act 2008, the Education and Inspections Act 2006, and the Childcare Act 2006: http://bit.ly/1HpOvY2

Toolkit

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  • Handout – School Inspection Handbook 2015 

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